pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 28, 1927: FDR incorporates the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, a rehabilitation home for polio patients
On this day in 1927, Franklin Roosevelt, who had contracted polio at age 39, created the nonprofit Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, the only hospital in the world to deal solely with the treatment of polio victims.  Roosevelt’s visits to Warm Springs began a few years prior, during which he experienced marked improvements in his health after swimming in the mineral water resort pools. 
The organization later became the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis and was instrumental in developing a cure for polio.
Learn more about all the Roosevelts with preview videos from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
Photo: Franklin Delano Roosevelt at his Georgia Warm Springs Foundation for polio patients, c.1930. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 28, 1927: FDR incorporates the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, a rehabilitation home for polio patients

On this day in 1927, Franklin Roosevelt, who had contracted polio at age 39, created the nonprofit Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, the only hospital in the world to deal solely with the treatment of polio victims.  Roosevelt’s visits to Warm Springs began a few years prior, during which he experienced marked improvements in his health after swimming in the mineral water resort pools.

The organization later became the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis and was instrumental in developing a cure for polio.

Learn more about all the Roosevelts with preview videos from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

Photo: Franklin Delano Roosevelt at his Georgia Warm Springs Foundation for polio patients, c.1930. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library.

Reblogged from pbsthisdayinhistory

neurosciencestuff:

What sign language teaches us about the brain
The world’s leading humanoid robot, ASIMO, has recently learnt sign language. The news of this breakthrough came just as I completed Level 1 of British Sign Language (I dare say it took me longer to master signing than it did the robot!). As a neuroscientist, the experience of learning to sign made me think about how the brain perceives this means of communicating.
For instance, during my training, I found that mnemonics greatly simplified my learning process. To sign the colour blue you use the fingers of your right hand to rub the back of your left hand, my simple mnemonic for this sign being that the veins on the back of our hand appear blue. I was therefore forming an association between the word blue (English), the sign for blue (BSL), and the visual aid that links the two. However, the two languages differ markedly in that one relies on sounds and the other on visual signs.
Do our brains process these languages differently? It seems that for the most part, they don’t. And it turns out that brain studies of sign language users have helped bust a few myths.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

What sign language teaches us about the brain

The world’s leading humanoid robot, ASIMO, has recently learnt sign language. The news of this breakthrough came just as I completed Level 1 of British Sign Language (I dare say it took me longer to master signing than it did the robot!). As a neuroscientist, the experience of learning to sign made me think about how the brain perceives this means of communicating.

For instance, during my training, I found that mnemonics greatly simplified my learning process. To sign the colour blue you use the fingers of your right hand to rub the back of your left hand, my simple mnemonic for this sign being that the veins on the back of our hand appear blue. I was therefore forming an association between the word blue (English), the sign for blue (BSL), and the visual aid that links the two. However, the two languages differ markedly in that one relies on sounds and the other on visual signs.

Do our brains process these languages differently? It seems that for the most part, they don’t. And it turns out that brain studies of sign language users have helped bust a few myths.

Read more

Reblogged from neurosciencestuff

argentarachnids asked:

The plague situation gets worse than that. Apparently the plague was brought to Europe by Mongolian forces in one of the first attempts at germ warfare. They would catapult their dying sick over walled cities to infect and cripple their targets but their forces were themselves too ravaged by the disease to ever begin the siege.

thewriters-blog answered:

Wow! That’s an amazing fact. I love things like this so much - there was actually a point in history where sick people were catapulted into cities as a form of warfare. Sounds like a Monty Python sketch!

Thank-you so much for your message! 😊😊

History facts over at The Writer’s Blog!

argentarachnids asked:

The plague situation gets worse than that. Apparently the plague was brought to Europe by Mongolian forces in one of the first attempts at germ warfare. They would catapult their dying sick over walled cities to infect and cripple their targets but their forces were themselves too ravaged by the disease to ever begin the siege.

Wow! That’s an amazing fact. I love things like this so much - there was actually a point in history where sick people were catapulted into cities as a form of warfare. Sounds like a Monty Python sketch!

Thank-you so much for your message! 😊😊

sapiosexual-musings:

andiamburdenedwithgloriousfeels:

riddlemehiddleston:


This came into work today. I shortlisted it and displayed it on my cafe counter.
The back said something like “He is into BDSM. (Batman, Dragons, Star Wars, and Magic the Gathering).”
The first paragraph starts like this:

“I growl with frustration at my reflection in the mirror. My hair is fifty shades of messed up. Why is it so kinky and out of control? I need to stop sleeping with it wet. As I brush my long brown hair, the girl in the mirror brown eyes too big for her, stares back at me. Wait… my eyes are blue! It dawns on me that I haven’t been looking in the mirror—I’ve been staring at a poster of Kirsten Stewart for the past five minutes. My own hair is fine.”


my own hair is fine
oh my god where can i buy this



I have read this book and I assure you it is literary gold.

sapiosexual-musings:

andiamburdenedwithgloriousfeels:

riddlemehiddleston:

This came into work today. I shortlisted it and displayed it on my cafe counter.

The back said something like “He is into BDSM. (Batman, Dragons, Star Wars, and Magic the Gathering).”

The first paragraph starts like this:

“I growl with frustration at my reflection in the mirror. My hair is fifty shades of messed up. Why is it so kinky and out of control? I need to stop sleeping with it wet. As I brush my long brown hair, the girl in the mirror brown eyes too big for her, stares back at me. Wait… my eyes are blue! It dawns on me that I haven’t been looking in the mirror—I’ve been staring at a poster of Kirsten Stewart for the past five minutes. My own hair is fine.”

my own hair is fine

oh my god where can i buy this

image

I have read this book and I assure you it is literary gold.

Reblogged from theotheristhedoctor